Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 12:26 pm



Guest wrote:The dream you're chasing is about as alive as Tom Petty. Have you ever sat down and done the math?
Even if your kid was the absolute knock out best player of all age levels in your hometown organisation, that would still put him at best as one of a thousand hometown best kids in Canada (1/1000) . and that is only if he is the absolute best in your town at any age.
Now add in the US .. it's bot just Canada's game anymore. Add say 2,000 more minor hockey towns.
Ahhh .. then there's Europe .. Sweden, Finland, Russia etc ... add about 5,000 more.
So now, even if your kid is the hands down best in your town, he's got to compete with about 10,000 other best in towns.
Now, how many new jobs do you suppose open for new players each season?
If each team played 3 new rookies per season, which is generous, that still only adds up to less than 100 jobs.
So, less than 100 jobs available to the best 10,000 kids in the world basically, and that is even IF your kid is in that first group, which it sounds like he is NOT.
Sweet dreams baby.


There's people in this world who strive for more regardless of they achieve all of what they set out to accomplish and others who don't care, set low bar life goals because the odds are stacked up against them and are content achieving the minimum they believe they can attain.

Sounds like you are in the latter of that populous.

I could care less if my child "makes it" but I support his effort, ethic, desire and stretch goal making, so that he doesn't lead a life like you.

Content with accomplishing the minimum society believes is what he can attain.
5 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:22 pm

^^^^^then you have twits like this who talk a good game, but are just arrogant, loud people with limited intellect. They treat children as if they were adults have no idea of how to help them reach their potential. Sure pressure is good, but these types put adult pressure on their kids. They are usually very disappointed in their kid’s ability and frustrates when they quit. These are the rules of people who blame everyone else for their own failures.

I commend them for setting the bar high, but laugh at them with their zero knowledge of how to get there, nor how to set reasonable expectations.

You are the topic of many jokes.
2 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 2:47 pm

Guest wrote:^^^^^then you have twits like this who talk a good game, but are just arrogant, loud people with limited intellect. They treat children as if they were adults have no idea of how to help them reach their potential. Sure pressure is good, but these types put adult pressure on their kids. They are usually very disappointed in their kid’s ability and frustrates when they quit. These are the rules of people who blame everyone else for their own failures.

I commend them for setting the bar high, but laugh at them with their zero knowledge of how to get there, nor how to set reasonable expectations.

You are the topic of many jokes.


LOL If you say so it must be a sure thing right Drummer Biff?
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 3:31 pm

Guest wrote:https://youtu.be/Vn3GDgINXxQ



hahahahahah the best thing ever on this site
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 3:59 pm

Guest wrote:^^^^^then you have twits like this who talk a good game, but are just arrogant, loud people with limited intellect. They treat children as if they were adults have no idea of how to help them reach their potential. Sure pressure is good, but these types put adult pressure on their kids. They are usually very disappointed in their kid’s ability and frustrates when they quit. These are the rules of people who blame everyone else for their own failures.

I commend them for setting the bar high, but laugh at them with their zero knowledge of how to get there, nor how to set reasonable expectations.

You are the topic of many jokes.


Yes, and you are clearly the authority on all knowledge on "how to get there"
People who throw out lame assumptions as a matter of proving their own point because they know they got handled and shown the ropes in a previous comment = you.

I give zero f!*%'s about your jokes you make or anyone else.

I have a child who I'm raising to be a superior leader who works hard and strives for more. That's all that matters to me. In fact, people who are satisfied with the mediocre like you in life because the odds stack up against them, make it easier for me to do my job.

Less competition in life my child has to deal with or myself for that matter. So thank you, for being you.
4 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:18 pm

You had me at "superior leader!"

I don't know is that can ever be topped on MHT.

You are the big winner for the greatest post ever!
2 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:28 pm

Guest wrote:You had me at "superior leader!"

I don't know is that can ever be topped on MHT.

You are the big winner for the greatest post ever!


Another accomplishment earned. Onto the next one.
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:39 pm

Guest wrote:
Guest wrote:You had me at "superior leader!"

I don't know is that can ever be topped on MHT.

You are the big winner for the greatest post ever!


Another accomplishment earned. Onto the next one.


Support the non-defeatist attitude.

But ‘superior leader’? Who are you, Clark from good will hunting?
1 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:10 am

Guest wrote:You had me at "superior leader!"

I don't know is that can ever be topped on MHT.

You are the big winner for the greatest post ever!


Someone call John Maxwell, there’s a 6th level of leadership that’s been identified
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:14 am

The only "leadership" on this site is the blind leading the blind.
2 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:27 am

Leadership... lol. West Point has nothing on rep hockey I guess... imagine, our future leaders working hard playing A hockey in the G. I guess that's better than being a drama teacher or snowboard instructor...
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:48 am

Guest wrote:Leadership... lol. West Point has nothing on rep hockey I guess... imagine, our future leaders working hard playing A hockey in the G. I guess that's better than being a drama teacher or snowboard instructor...



Reaching ones potential is the ultimate accomplishment. The unfortunate part of this whole scenario is the accurate identification of ones potential is often miscalculated due to ego and lack of knowledge. Let the cards fall where they may and go with the flow.
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Postby Google » Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:48 am

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Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 1:31 pm

Guest wrote:
Guest wrote:Leadership... lol. West Point has nothing on rep hockey I guess... imagine, our future leaders working hard playing A hockey in the G. I guess that's better than being a drama teacher or snowboard instructor...



Reaching ones potential is the ultimate accomplishment. The unfortunate part of this whole scenario is the accurate identification of ones potential is often miscalculated due to ego and lack of knowledge. Let the cards fall where they may and go with the flow.



I agree with your first point about reaching one's potential being a player's ultimate accomplishment. I also believe that, specifically related to minor hockey, parents and coaches are trying to do as you say and "accurate identify a player's potential" as early as possible. You are also right that the ego's of both parents and coaches fuel a never ending quest to measure themselves, not at the end of goal of future potential, but immediately, for this season, the next tournament or to win the next game. I am not even convinced its a lack of knowledge, because all the information out there supports a long term approach to development, to reaching one's potential. The saying "it's a marathon, not a race," is thrown about all the time-yet it is ignored almost every time. I think people-parents and coaches-are choosing to ignore all the information out there BECAUSE of their egos and belief that you have to win now. They believe that somehow success today, will be a sure sign of success long term. This has now become an arms race of who can do more, specialize more, play more, PAY more, travel more, sacrifice more, etc etc. all to win immediately.
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 1:32 pm

.....

They have lost sight of what it means for their kid to work to reach his potential, and this takes time and patience. They also forget that each kid needs to build a foundation so that eventually THEY chose what their potential will be, NOT daddy. To many push so hard, that the kid does a 180 and and starts down a different path, perhaps because he is always injured, lost his passion, hates the never ending pressure.

I don't agree though that you can simply let the cards fall where they may. Perhaps I am not interpreting you right here. I think that an overall approach to athleticism, playing multiple sports, guided by parents, less pressure, REST, but informed work and quality repetition without overdoing it, are needed to reach your potential. It's a road that has many curves, and perhaps this is what you mean by going with the flow and not being a rigid follower of more is better.

In the end, use the information out there, it helps, more isn't better, play multiple sports, let your kid find his dream and then help him get there.
2 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 1:51 pm

I'm a dad who knows very little about hockey but here's my best approach. Put him on skates young and only focus on his skating ability while making him play recreational hockey. Save all your money because being top young is not usually the best route. If he's a good skater he will always play competitive and that's where you want him so he can increase his level of hockey IQ on his own, learning to react quick is very important and that comes with playing competitive hockey naturally. Don't need to spend money cause it's money lost at that age. When he hits pewee and things start to matter then you can start getting him some private skills lessons to give him a small advantage, he'll be so excited that he's actually getting better that his drive will start growing on its own instead of being fed of all that training he'd been going through because dad had him in non stop session since 6 years old. Now you have a child who is hungry to become the best. Increase his skills and skating session in bantam years and see him develop into a real player. If it's in him to be a pro that's the best route and only at half the cost. Most kids that peak early drop out by Bantam and MM.
2 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 1:53 pm

Guest wrote:

I agree with your first point about reaching one's potential being a player's ultimate accomplishment. I also believe that, specifically related to minor hockey, parents and coaches are trying to do as you say and "accurate identify a player's potential" as early as possible. You are also right that the ego's of both parents and coaches fuel a never ending quest to measure themselves, not at the end of goal of future potential, but immediately, for this season, the next tournament or to win the next game. I am not even convinced its a lack of knowledge, because all the information out there supports a long term approach to development, to reaching one's potential. The saying "it's a marathon, not a race," is thrown about all the time-yet it is ignored almost every time. I think people-parents and coaches-are choosing to ignore all the information out there BECAUSE of their egos and belief that you have to win now. They believe that somehow success today, will be a sure sign of success long term. This has now become an arms race of who can do more, specialize more, play more, PAY more, travel more, sacrifice more, etc etc. all to win immediately.


Aren't you the guy who argued for the use of private instruction based on necessity - and now you say it is an arms race? Does that mean you ignore the information as well? You're the very parent you protest against, feeding fuel to the hamster wheel you put your kid on.
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 2:09 pm

As with EVERY kid out there, there is no play book, no comprehensive set of instructions, no magic formula for success. There is trial and error, or trial and success. If hockey is meant to be for your child past whatever age, it is meant to be. If not, so be it, it is only a game. Promote and support a healthy lifestyle, a drive for success in all endeavours - be they sports, academics or otherwise. Only the people involved in the decision making paradigm will have true insight into what works or does not work, and so listen to yourselves most of all.
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:27 pm

Pushing kids to work hard and try hard exists everywhere - sports, arts, school. There is NOTHING wrong with encouraging your kid and using your time and resources to support them to be the best they can be. But in these parts, hockey is the one where many parents do so with some belief that it could lead to the dream. I've heard dads at the rink talking about their hopes for a scholarship or draft pick, without a hint of irony that the money they're pouring into hockey would pay for college or university five times over. The "dream" goes way beyond resources or opportunity or even skill or talent. So much of it amounts to luck and timing. And as people here have broken down, the odds are beyond low.

Find yourself a guy who was a superstar as a kid then made it as far as the AHL or OHL and talk to him about what happens after the age of 13. The ones who hit the cusp and got no further than that. Or the guys who did make the NHL but had their careers end after 1 or 2 or even 5 years. Or 1, 2 or 5 games. The sacrifices they had to make and the severely limited options they were left with once the show was officially over. Man, even read Wendel Clark's autobiography about a legend with a decades long career - that actual one in a million - washed up and aching and aimless before his 40th birthday. The dream isn't all that dreamy. As hard as I push and support my kids at hockey and other things they do, I'd way rather hear from my kid that he wants to be a beer league playing doctor than an NHL player.

I guess my point is that it's obviously great to teach your kids to strive and work hard and reach for the top. But it's also our job to teach them about reality. With all that pushing, we'd better make it about the love of the sport over everything else.
1 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:32 pm

Guest wrote:I'm a dad who knows very little about hockey but here's my best approach. Put him on skates young and only focus on his skating ability while making him play recreational hockey. Save all your money because being top young is not usually the best route. If he's a good skater he will always play competitive and that's where you want him so he can increase his level of hockey IQ on his own, learning to react quick is very important and that comes with playing competitive hockey naturally. Don't need to spend money cause it's money lost at that age. When he hits pewee and things start to matter then you can start getting him some private skills lessons to give him a small advantage, he'll be so excited that he's actually getting better that his drive will start growing on its own instead of being fed of all that training he'd been going through because dad had him in non stop session since 6 years old. Now you have a child who is hungry to become the best. Increase his skills and skating session in bantam years and see him develop into a real player. If it's in him to be a pro that's the best route and only at half the cost. Most kids that peak early drop out by Bantam and MM.


For a guy who says he knows little about the game, you’ve spoken very wise words.

The late bloomers are typically the ones who hit their stride in peewee and excel through Bantam and beyond with passion and desire. Typically it’s the “superstars” who excelled from the moment they got their skates put on them through to minor peewee who start to struggle because the level catches up to them and kids surpass them. When this happens, dads tend to go crazy overboard with skill sessions and work their kid to the bone and that’s when kids burn out and decide for themselves they are done.
See it allllll the time.
0 x

Guest

Re: Am I the first to admit that I’m chasing the dream?

Postby Guest » Wed Jul 18, 2018 10:37 pm

If your kid loves it, go for it. Providing they are 12+ and showing you the work is fun for them.
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